Museums in Kansas City

Kansas City museums are some of the most regarded in the Midwest. A variety of different displays are available to the public. Kansas City museums are an excellent and entertaining approach to brush up on history knowledge. From Art and sports to WWII museums, all avenues of history can be explored within the Kansas City area.

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198 Kansas City Museum
Kansas City Museum at Corinthian Hall is Kansas City’s oldest and largest museum of local and regional history. The Museum opened in 1940, located in the former home of Kansas City lumber entrepreneur and philanthropist Robert A. Long. The Museum collections are encyclopedic and represent major periods of the City’s development from the mid-19th century to the present day. Of particular interest are some of the original furnishings from the residence, and the carriages and tack, as well as hundreds of ribbons and trophies, of Mrs. Combs’ storied career in the horse show ring.
3218 Gladstone Blvd.
Kansas City, MO 64123-1199
Phone: (816) 483-8300
http://kansascitymuseum.org/
197 Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art is dedicated to the enjoyment and understanding of the visual arts and the varied cultures they represent. It is committed through its collections and programs to being a vital partner in the educational and cultural life of Kansas City and a preeminent institution both nationally and internationally. The Nelson-Atkins strives to achieve this goal by adherence to the highest professional standards in the collection, preservation, exhibition and interpretation of works of art.
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO 64111
Phone: 816-751-1278
http://www.nelson-atkins.org/
199 Steamboat Arabia
The Arabia Steamboat Museum is home to a true time capsule of frontier life in the 1800s. The Arabia was headed up the Missouri River in the fall of 1856 when she struck a tree snag and sank just north of Kansas City. Her cargo hold was full of 200 tons of supplies bound for general stores and pioneer settlements. As the years passed, the river changed course and left the Arabia buried beneath a Kansas cornfield. Finally, in 1988 a group of modern-day adventurers uncovered the lost Arabia and her magnificent cargo. They were amazed to find fine dishware, clothing, and even bottled food all preserved in remarkable condition. Their find has been called the King Tut’s Tomb of the Missouri River. So, if you’re looking for an adventure your whole family will enjoy, discover the treasures of the steamboat Arabia.
400 Grand Blvd.
Kansas City, MO 64106
Phone: 816-471-4030
http://www.1856.com/
200 Union Station
Built in 1914, Union Station encompasses 850,000 square feet and originally featured 900 rooms. In its prime as a working train station, accommodated tens of thousands of passengers every year. Today’s Union Station is filled with fine restaurants and unique shops. And just like in 1914, you can catch the train at Union Station’s Amtrak stop. Union Station also houses the permanent collections and archives for Union Station Kansas City, Inc./Kansas City Museum. Union Station’s goal is it be recognized as the region’s finest educational and cultural resource committed to the preservation and interpretation of Kansas City’s regional history and the promotion of innovation, research and discovery in science and technology through the development of collections, exhibitions and other educational programs for all citizens of and visitors to the Greater Kansas City metropolitan area.
30 W. Pershing Rd.
Kansas City, MO 64108
Phone: (816) 460-2020
http://www.unionstation.org/index2.php
201 National WWI Museum
The National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial inspires thought, dialogue, and learning to make the experiences of the World War I era meaningful and relevant for present and future generations. The museum interprets the history of World War I to encourage public involvement and informed decision-making, maintains the Liberty Memorial as a beacon of freedom and a symbol of the courage, patriotism, sacrifice, and honor of all who served in World War I, provides exhibitions and educational programs that engage diverse audiences and collects historical materials with the highest professional standards.
100 W. 26th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108
Phone: 816-888-8100
http://www.theworldwar.org/s/110/new/index_community.aspx
205 Negro Leagues Baseball Museum
The Negro Leagues Baseball Museum exists to preserve, research and disseminate the history of African American Baseball in general, and the professional Negro Leagues in particular. Founded in 1990, The Negro Leagues Baseball Museum (NLBM) is designated by the U.S. Congress as “America’s Home” to Negro Leagues baseball history. It is the only institution soley dedicated to preserving the history of African American Baseball. The NLBM features a multi-media museum experience set on a time line of black history and baseball history. Through films, computer displays, photographs and artifacts, one will learn great lessons about race, sports, and culture.
1616 East 18th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108
Phone: (816) 221-1920
http://www.nlbm.com/
206 Kauffman Legacy Park
Kauffman Legacy Park encompasses thirty-seven acres near the Country Club Plaza in the heart of the Brush Creek Corridor, a six-square-mile area in Kansas City, Missouri’s midtown is dedicated to the development of a world-class cultural and research district surrounded by healthy neighborhoods. Three separate but adjacent areas comprise Kauffman Legacy Park: the offices of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation with adjoining Kauffman Conference Center, the Ewing and Muriel Kauffman Memorial Garden, and the Anita B. Gorman Conservation Discovery Center. Comparable to parks across Europe, this beautiful and contemplative space in all seasons is the gravesite of the late Ewing and Muriel Kauffman.
4800 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, Missouri 64110
Phone: (816) 932-1200
http://www.kauffman.org/about-foundation/kauffman-legacy-park.aspx